Landmarks Heritage Preservation Commission

For over a decade the City of Omaha, in cooperation with the Nebraska State Historical Society (NSHS), has contracted with various local and regional preservation contractors to conduct Nebraska Historic Building Surveys (NeHBS) of various neighborhoods in the City of Omaha. These surveys have been conducted to document properties that possess historic or architectural significance. To date, over eighteen (18) areas in Omaha have been identified and surveyed in the subject neighborhoods for Nebraska Historic Building Survey level studies with thousands of properties and districts recommended as potentially eligible for the National Register, both as individual properties and districts.

Each survey area conducted contains over thousands of properties and most of the properties surveyed to date have consisted of late nineteenth and early twentieth century residential, commercial and institutional resources. Later Reconnaissance areas have included mid-century modern resources.

    Map of Survey Areas to date:

NHRS Areas 2016

The reconnaissance-level-surveys have been conducted in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Archaeology and Historic Preservation and Standards for Identification and Evaluation and the NeHBS survey standards. In addition to the administrative project responsibilities completed by the City of Omaha, NeHBS projects are directed by the Nebraska State Historic Preservation Office (NeSHPO) with cooperation of the Nebraska State Historic Society (NSHS). The NeHBS is funded in part with the assistance of a federal grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service.

 

 

NEW! Omaha's Historic Streetcar System now available

The Historic Streetcar System Intensive Level Survey identified development patterns that occurred as the streetcar network expanded throughout Omaha between 1868 and 1955. Commercial clusters in these areas are closely associated with walkable, pedestrian oriented neighborhoods, a goal of many modern urban redevelopment projects. As the neighborhoods in the older sections of Omaha continue to evolve, the underlying pattern of development that many were founded upon may erode, leaving the defining character of many historic areas under direct threat and vulnerable to loss. This study allows planners, preservationists and residents to better understand what exists in Omaha and how walkable, historic neighborhood commercial centers can be supported in future growth and development.

Reconnaissance Survey PDF Archives:

1_2002_Selected Neighborhoods in Omaha (Benson)

Book

Database

Map

 

2_2003_Selected Neighborhoods in Central Omaha

Book

Database

Map

 

3_2004_Dundee and Twin Ridge Morton Meadows Neighborhoods

Book

Database

Map

 

4_2005_Portions of South Omaha 

Book

Database

Map

 

5_2006_Portions of South Central Omaha

Book

Database

Map

 

6_2007_Portions of North Omaha

Book

Database

Map

 

7_2008_Portions of North Central Omaha

Book

Database

Map

 

8_2008_Community of Elkhorn

Book

Database

Map

 

9_2008_Portions of South Omaha

Book

Database

Map

 

10_2009_Selected Neighborhoods in West Central Omaha

Book

Database

Map

 

11_2009_Selected Neighborhoods in Central and South Omaha

Book

Database

Map

 

12_2010_Millard

Book

Database

Map

 

13_2010_Selected Mid-Century Modern Neighborhoods

Book 1 Book 2

Database

Map

 

14_2011_Downtown and Columbus Park

Book

Database

Map

 

15_2011_Hanscom Park Neighborhood

Book

Database

Map

 

16_2011_Elmwood Park Neighborhood

Book

Database

Map

 

17_2015_Aksarben Neighborhood

Book

Database

Map

 

18_2016_North Omaha Update

Book

Database

Map

 

A_1980_Comprehensive Program for Historic Preservation in Omaha

Book

 

B_1984_Patterns on the Landscape (North Omaha)

Book

 

C_1980_An Inventory of Historic Omaha Buildings

Book